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. >> a look now at the cost of higher education. heads of universities in inyland, north carolina meet capitol hill to talk about higher education at lower cost. lawmakers are considering changes to the higher education act which is said to expire at year's end. two hours.ut >> today is the second in our series to examine post secondary education. discuss is ofill interest to policymakers -- that is innovation in higher education. we have spent time in this committee discussing the role of innovation, but much of that was focused on college affordability. while that is of paramount importance, we would like to thed this hearing examining landscape of innovations in higher education that increase student learning, engagement, and degree completion. if our nation is going to , we needore students to do more to ensure students are persisting towards and obtaining quality degrees. what can colleges and universities do to maximize learning and support? to ensure students are getting through on time, or faster and earning a meaningful credential. today's panel explores efforts and progress at the in
an education and to go to school. >> what do you most admire about malala? [laughter] >> that is a difficult question. i think malala is an average girl but something which is -- [laughter] something extraordinary about her machine ever agrees with me. [laughter] she always jokes and she is very humorous. she had so many meetings on the stage. one special quality she has that she doesn't create a mistake again -- i mean, if she has made a mistake in life that once so she doesn't repeat her mistakes. she's very respectful to her teachers and her elders. >> i would ask it does start with you is when you were in a girls' school in pakistan, malala come attended an i have to announce what the view this passion for education because i think it is when you are the person who is on the bottom who want to rise but it is another when you are on the top and who want to share the privileges that you have as a man and a household. so where did you get your passion for the girls' education? >> basically i was born in a society where girls were ignored they are in the developing and poor countries. the wo
states, you probably have better access to education, health care, economic empowerment than just about anywhere except the nordic country in europe. on the other hand, we have so many fewer women in congress, in parliament than other countries and we've certainly never had a female country leader and something like 60 countries to this date have, most of them democratically elected at this point. does your generation kid itself in terms of where america really is, in terms of women's rights. >> still think we lead the world? >> i think that many probably are uneducated on that issue, probably do think that. however, at the same time i know so many young women are very concerned about getting more women in congress, first woman president. everyone knows we haven't had the first woman president yet and other countries have. margaret thatcher they know. this is something that -- that's an issue that young women in my generation are very concerned about. when it comes down to food, water, places to live, things like that i really just say that they have no idea what it's like in some of th
back to a point where you go through the normal process of moving the bills, the labor education bill, the defense bill, move them all individually. there is not enough time when we talk about the calendar. there is not enough time to move all of the bills individually at this point. host: sarah from dover, pennsylvania. caller: good morning. i would like to change the subject a little bit if i can. i live on medicare. the medicare and food stamps -- i am surviving on $125 a week. if they take food stamps away from me -- the -- [indiscernible] he needs to feeds us first before he feeds anyone else. and also, we have a place to live. our guys come home from the service. they are losing because they have no place to live. i would like to see that to happen, too. thank you. host: there is a story in politico. the headline talks about the farm bill that it gets no respect, referencing rodney dangerfield. why is this an important discussion happening? guest: the last time we had a farm bill, that law expired in 2008. what is it, 2013? it has been five years since we had a new farm bill pas
was going on on the ground. an urban city well-educated and libyans have exploded with access to soft loans over the internet. of the kids were getting shot as they tried to move around the cities so they began to use gugler and android sell funds to plot the locations of the snipers shooting at them. they would put pins in the map don't go down that street. the french start to see these pins appearing on buglers. so they flew reconnaissance mission so then they obviously started to bomb those positions when the school kids realize to free-market the french will baum it they went out to mark every position they could find and then whenever destroyed they would take them down and disappear from to coerce. -- google immerse a crowd source synchronized bombing a system that the pentagon spent billions of dollars the school kids are on the ground because they have access to connectivity that would have been impossible three of four years ago. as far as i can tell talking to kids on the ground those on the french task force at no time did they ever talk to each other it was self synchronized bas
are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. >> i'm candy crowley in washington with a check of headlines. new details about the shooting rampage at los angeles international airport. federal authorities say suspected gunman paul ciancia shot tsa officer gerardo hernandez multiple times at pointblank range, went up an escalator and then returned to shoot hernandez again. earlier on cnn's "state of the union," michael mccaul described what police found as a suicide note and said mental illness was a chief reason behind the shooting. the 23-year-old ciancia is currently hospitalized in police custody. he's charged with two felonies including the murder of a federal officer. terminal three at l.a.x. is open today. >>> secretary of state john kerry is in the middle east for meeting with u.s. allies. one of kerry's key missions is to smooth relations with saudi arabia which is upse
own life and i would say a poster girl for this era. well-educated, highly professional, the other, and not drink two or 34 glasses of wine per night the five or six and i caught myself quickly and went to rehab. >> can you talk about that with the addiction? >> i was full of shame. i was deeply humiliated by my a behavior. but i did blackout. right before i went to sleep. i said i would get a handle on it. of favorite cousin was killed by a drunk driver. i will just quit and i couldn't. i knew i was addicted. it was confounding. so i thought it could not be the alcohol. >> host: just like the year on the wall imi the other after all. do you think what you experienced was pretty experience -- common with other women? >> guest: i know the behavior coming the extreme behavior i was involved in was the far end of the spectrum that i became addicted. the larger group are not it is only 2.5 percent of those better actually alcoholic. but a lot of women have risky behavior, the binge drinking cdc warned about the fact that this was of epidemic proportions. and that is what we don't focus
will be able to come. ine education system afghanistan, not just higher education. universities, the number that was given to me is so i don'ttuitive use it. in terms of the lower grades before you get to colleges and universities, before the taliban was driven out to the been, 900,000ave boys in afghan schools ten or so.ago now 8 million students in schools. about 3 million of those are girls. none of whom could have been educated before we got there allies.r in 2001, under the taliban were 20,000 teachers, all male. now 200,000 teachers. 60,000 of whom are women. healthcare many improved. significantlyty down. refugeeslion afghan who fled to pakistan have returned home. that 67% of the a mostan people in recent survey think that the afghan war was not worth fighting? how did that happen? the picture is much, number.tter than that i just don't believe that the american people have had a fair or fuller picture of the events in afghanistan. that the press has story. a good it hasn't missed the problems. it has missed the progress. our peoplesion that either.sn't come from it comes from what
system, our education system, our access to energy, could make this a platform that every country around the world wants to be in. and growth here at home. >> we will close down. thank you so much for all of thoughts. well done. [ applause ] >> tonight, on c-span. armed services committee chairman senator carl levin inlks about the situation afghanistan. followed by remarks from obama and prime minister of iraq nouri themaliki and remarks at antidefamanion league. week, michigan senator carl levin traveled to and met with president karzai. today, the senate armed services committee chairman about improvements in the country as the u.s. and prepare to remove troops from afghanistan in 2014. from the council on foreign relations. is an hour. >> welcome to the foreign relations. i'm johnathan karl. a high honor to be here with levin. introduction.s no interduck carl levin is the chairman of the senate armed services from the great state of michigan and of special interest to me, just back from a trip to afghanistan where he commanders over there and also had a one on one president karzai. i
innovation and education because of the nature of our communities and the structure and the openness with which they operate. that people will have access here because we will continue to work hard to make sure that we have the most qualified workers one of the largest consumer market in the world. this, i do not say any of with one bit of arrogance. good newsecause that for america is also good news for the world. it is good news for you and your businesses. nina the importance of the american economy in terms of driving china's economy and other economies in the world. their importance is driving other economies in the region and elsewhere. it is a principle reason why we should invest in here. it is a top priority at a level i might any before. -- unlike any before. you're sitting here in the hot -- heart of the most open economy in the world. the u.s. is the largest recipient of direct investment. manufacturing was mentioned. we have about 5.6 million total good paying american jobs contribute in close to when chilean dollars to our economy that comes from foreign direct investme
the excellence in u.s. higher education, how that helped us, training more and better engineers, but those days are ending. so our natural design advantages are going to be harder to come by going forward. and so we need those things, so we are not starting with a 10% cost disadvantage. >> in asia. what would it mean for caterpillar? >> we have a huge business in asia and growing. that is the single largest opportunity over the next decade or so. we intend to be that market. but again, i come back to the point that it is likely that a lot of those countries, a number of those, will do agreements with or without us. if we don't get tpp done. we will look into a market that we ought to be competing with. i'll move to africa because i am passionate about this. we watched the chinese really take over africa. they've come in with their own financing, their own engineering, sometimes their own workers to take over minerals, extraction, oil and gas, hydroelectric power across africa. i know, michael, that is on your agenda. but i am so pleased to hear that the crossover between commerce and the state,
just to get them to classes. educators have not tried this and don't know yet if it will help. a lot are paying attention. >> there's a different early morning buzz in anchorage schools - more hustle at ag diamond's high to avoid the tardy table. perfect attendance means more? >> kids are talking about it. community members are talking about it. i hear it on radio. >> they are talking about the free car, the $24,000 prize for being here every day. >> a free car, that's a reason to get out of bed and come to school. >> only juniors and seniors like carlie and nicky have a chance. winning is not a teenage pie in the sky fantasy. what are the odds? they are not that bad. there's about 3200 juniors and seniors in the district. last year 182 had perfect attendance. perfect means perfect. no missed school days for any reason. it gets you into a drawing for the free wheels donated by autodealer troy jarvis who came up with the idea. he admits it's a good advertising gymic, but hopes insent vicing attendance can teach kids a lesson. outside the classroom in the world of work you have to sho
a better education and if you can be more creative, you'll do better and if you don't, then unfortunately you're going to be struggling. >> what are you worried about when you look at new york after bloomberg? what are you worried about being undone or a legacy of government that will be perhaps eroded? >> i think most of the things we've done hopefully if we've done a good job will stay in place. yesterday i was in london. the weather was nice. you think better of any city when the sun is shining. but london is a real competitor to new york. and we've got to understand if we were to stop improving, stop diversifying, stop investing, we will get pushed back and other places will take over. i was in paris the day before. i had dinner with some people all of whom talked about their friends moving out of paris and out of france because tax rates are so high. those are people that will create jobs and pay taxes down the road. you can't hold the waves from coming in. you have to keep making society open and you have to keep providing opportunities. if you start to focus on equal results rather
(footballnames.ecl) environment especially for a young children that they get good education, and in afghanistan it's impossible for the kids, especially for the one who is working with the american for their kids it's impossible to goe go to the schools or kindergarten to get education. but for here there is no more fear of taliban to get my children or harm my children. i you can sen can send them to s or kindergarten for a good education. >> i saw somewhere you said that in afghanistan they would learn to hold guns. here they will learn to hold a pencil and paper. >> yeah. janis when he got off the plane last night i asked him, what does this mean to you? my kids instead of having to learn how to predict and defend -- protect and defend themselves, when they go to school they will be taught to hold a pen and pencil and piece of paper. >> janis welcom well to welcomed states. >> straight ahead the surprising pick for the most powerful person in the world. and mariel hemingway talks about millions who need assistance now. we appreciate you spending time with us tonight. >>> up next is the golde
kids are going to have a really tough road. and the fact that the government is educating parents, making fruits and vegetables, reducing the sugar content in school lunches is critically important to getting control of our health and reducing the cost of health care. frankly, obama care with preventative care will help that. >> i have to get john in here. do you think government should have a role in our refrigerators, which is basically what we're talking about? >> good lord, no. government is not educating anything. look at our education system. we keep going down in the rankings. as the only person on this panel that weighing over 250 pounds, if you send me a letter for eating a chocolate bunny on easter, we're going to have a fight. we have lazy kids in this country. they need a boot on their hind quarters to get them out and play in the yard. they don't need notes on halloween. that's ridiculous. >> this lady as far as i'm concerned should be addressed as a bully because that's what she was. >>> thanks, guys. and thanks to bernard whitman for joining us. >> thank you for hav
. the education system and afghanistan. so many of them, the number given to them is counterintuitive. so i do not use it. in terms of the lower grades, before you get to colleges and universities, before the taliban was driven out, to the extent they have been, 900,000 boys. now a million students in school . 3 million of those are girls. none of those who could've been educated before we got there with our allies. were 20,000e teachers, all male. is now 200,000 teachers. 60,000 of whom are women. health care much improved. child mortality significantly down. afghan refugees who fled pakistan have returned home. how is it that 67% of the american people recent survey think that the afghan war was not worth fighting? how did that happen? because the picture is much, much better than that number. i just don't believe that the american people have had a fair or fuller picture of the events in afghanistan. i believe that the press has missed a good story. it hasn't missed the problems. it has missed the progress. the impression that our people get doesn't come from either. it comes from what they
from educated, trained personnel and the value of quality we are offering on the greek islands is in comparison with other nations. we must take things in our hands. so we are working harder. we are looking better for our products and we are trying to have good quality. that is very important. it seems like our efforts up to now, people are traveling to greece. >> i've spoken to a lot of italians and ask them how they step away from all of the austerity measures and the shenanigans of government and say focusing on business. they say you would never have a business if you listened to the politics. is it a major business increase? >> no, it is not. me as a businessman in tourism, i understand i have to fight and i have to fight for my world and my world is tourism. austerity doesn't help. now we are in the sixth year under austerity measures but somehow we all -- you know, economies go through cycle. we need more of a boost. tourism is giving us the moral boost we need as a nation and as a country. >> what are the problems of raising money in this market. how do you access more
our country who are trying to save for their retirements, save for their children's college education, saving for their first home, are not harmed by confusing, costly regulations coming out of washington. mr. speaker, all americans know that a flood -- a flood -- of shington red tape has hurt our economy. that's why tens of millions of our fellow countrymen remain unemployeed or underemployed. unfortunately, more regulations are on the way. specifically today, mr. speaker, we are speaking about the securities and exchange commission and the department of labor who are headed toward proposing two massive and inconsistent rule makings. they're going to hurt the ability of retail investors to get financial advice that they need for their portion of the american dream. mr. speaker, retail investors are not big-time professionals on wall street. retail investors had no role in causing the financial crisis. and they should not be punished for it which reglet -- which regrettably this rule making could do. rather retailers are hardworking citizens from our congressional districts who buy an
the task of giving kids an equal education. -- dedicated to accomplishing the task of giving kids an equal education. they said they were going to back off of strong civil rights enforcement. i had to make a decision. do i uphold the law or back off of my principal? ini fight for what i believe or do i sacrifice my job? i lost my job. but i have never regretted the decision is standing for what you believe in. [applause] i went back to monterey and public service was still in my veins so i ran for congress and served a terms of the congress. eight terms. it was a different congress. el.er tip o'neill, bob michae we just honored tom foley the other day, speaker and a majority leader. republicans and democrats work together. toy work together to try solve the problems facing this country. yes, they had their differences. yes, they had their politics. when it came to issues affecting the country, they worked together for the common good and that's the way our democracy should work. [applause] clinton asked me then to take over the office of management and budget. the good people there helped
in getting it into the education system and am wondering if you could talk about that along with the press that we need to get people interested because it's all about selling new ideas. we don't talk about complexity. we live in a complex system. finally, last night i saw a play called "love in afghanistan." i think it's one of the most powerful plays of ever seen and i'm a performing arts junkie. i recommend everyone to go see it. it was fabulous. it addresses the things were talking about. >> it's a really important point. somebody brought over some young afghan music students about six months ago. it was terrific. we brought them to the capital so that some of my colleagues could see. i think there were like eight students on afghan instruments at a music school which could have never existed and they are there preserving their heritage. it has an impact when people can see a play or whatever, of course it does. telling stories are important. the problem on the other side is i'm not a good storyteller, by the way. i admire those of my colleagues who are. it's the most powerful way to g
any taxes at all. and he said while other countries are spending money on health care education and infrastructure we are spending unbelievable amounts on our military. do you think our military budget is sane when we are strapping our new generation with education debts that are unbelievable, what are your thoughts? guest: number one, yes, i understand what senator sanders is saying. corporations do receive credits, deductions, exclusions that could avoid -- that could result in them not having to pay their corporate income tax rate. i think one of the critical factors hopefully that congress can continue to address is corporate tax reform, in which case we could eliminate it. on defense spending, no question in my mind that additional reductions in defense spending are going to have to happen, are going to have to go forward and done in a way that focuses on strategic goals of protecting this country going forward. and yes, again, we are back to the same situation, balancing out those spending reductions, in defense, food stamps, child nutrition programs. we have to find a bal
the past few decades, these public efforts have helped educate people and promote awareness about breast cancer. but we must remain vigilant in the fight because there's still so much more to be done. the statistics are sobering. one in eight women will get breast cancer in her lifetime. this disease strikes women and some men of all backgrounds, races, ethnicities and ages. while all women are at risk, many still think it can't happen to them, especially young women. but i know all too well that it can. in 2007 when i was just 41 years old, i learned i had breast cancer. while we've made significant advances on some fronts, recent studies show that more and more young women are being diagnosed with breast cancer and rates are not going down. i believe we have a responsibility as members of congress to take breast cancer awareness month one step further and turn awareness into action. we must take action to implement the affordable care act and continue to ensure that every single person in this country has access to the information they need to make informed decisions about their health
to the future, we need to make it stronger by improving worker training and education, upgrading our infrastructure, and growing our manufacturing base. the truth is, there are additional things we can add and do to make america even stronger as a magnet for investment. before talking about what make ours economy such an attractive place to invest, and what we plan to do to make it even more atrabtive, i'd like to start by saying a few words about the state of the world economy. there's broad evidence of recovery across the global landscape. economic conditions, particularly in advanced economies, have improved, but there's no doubt that global command is not where it needs to be. in too many countries, unemployment levels are unacceptably high, especially among young people. as i said before, leaders around the world should make strengthening demand and creating jobs a priority to unlock growth that's robust, sustainable, and balanced. looking at europe, it seems the long recession is slowly fading even as critical steps have been taken to restore financial stability. this is good n
'm going to be able to become to doing so. in education system afghanistan, not just higher education, but so many universities that the number of them even to me as counterintuitive so i don't use them. before you get to colleges and universities and before the taliban and was driven out, and they said they have been, 9000 now onethe schools am million. about 3 million of them are girls but none of them could have been educated before we got there with our allies. 2001, there were 20,000 teachers, all-male. there are now 200,000 teachers, 60,000 of them are women. improved., much child mortality, significantly down. 5 million afghan refugees fled to pakistan and have returned .ome is it that 67% of the american people in the most recent survey think the afghan war was not worth fighting? how does that happen? the picture is much, much better number.t i just don't believe that the american people have had a fair or more full picture of the events in afghanistan. i believe the press has missed a good story. it has not missed of the problems but it has missed the progress. the impressio
they are still a child. and these should somebody in school and should be well educated and not going to the house. you are pushing for the banning of child marriages to be included in the amendment of the constitution. why is it important to do that? why not make it a legislation? >> that is very important. i have been for more than taken years before being a minister in the committee. and that was our mone pain conc. main concern. our mandate is to for women advancement. and one of the women a advantagesment in the country or make any development for women girls especially in the area did not get a chance to go to the school or if they started schooling. >> the question is why include it into the constitution? >> the social rights of women and the social rights of children and you know that yemen is a party to many conventions one of the conventions is the child convention. and we are convention to eliminate all sorts of abuse against wind. wind -- women. it will not be in the princple of the constitution. it will be. >> i do need to get in very quickly, there is a lot of objection
dew point me to talk. i can go back to the south of france. >> i want you to educate what report suggests that george w. bush tapped the phones of world leaders? >> when did this start? >> four or five years ago. >> 2002. >> 2002. >> the tapping of foreign leaders. >> yes. so you have to apply the same questions to president bush, first of all, whether they do or do not know. i think barnacle brought up the biggest point and that is the nsa overreaching in its power, is this something people want done but they don't want to hear about it. you got to look at that part of it too because we can apply this to a couple of different issues that we complained about or argued about on our set about the conduct of the bush administration. but i would say that most importantly, the important disconnect that i think is happening in this story is that people are thinking that like someone is sitting there listening to her conversations. the phone calls are being monitored. that's different than tapping the phone. >> this is gene. i did write about it this morning. >> i was reading that. >> t
of you know and many of you probably were educated in the united states. i cannot tell you how many heads of state and finance ministers throughout government, heads of state and chief executives who i need as i travel the world as a senator to go to school who participated in educational exchanges and the fulbright program, meet them everywhere. foreign ministers in saudi arabia who has been foreign minister for 30 years or more. he proudly reminds me of his education at princeton. and another showed me a photograph and said this was you and me 25, 35 years ago when i met you at a law of diplomacy school when you were a senator. many immigrants know that the american dream is not restricted to those born in america. if you go to miami, chicago, san francisco, any major city in america, you will find a community that speaks your language and understand your culture and welcomes diversity and can serve as an anchor for your next venture. it is not just the big cities. you heard it from secretary pritzker and president obama. success stories. indian manufacturers expanding plants in upstate
. especially when our labour is unskilled. educate only at school, training is important. there's a lot of unemployment still here. >> they call him indonesia's works class leader. he's organised hundreds of thousands of workers. his work is not without danger. it does not stop him from organising more workers. 37 million registered workers, 12% only are part of a labour union. others are afraid. >> translation: police beat up our members during protests. i'm being threatened that i will be shot or killed on the spot if i keep leading the movement. >>. >> igbal is undeterred. he's determined to improve the life of the workers so the gap between the rich and poor in indonesia will close. >> student demonstrations against egypt's military-backed government turned violent. supporters of the anti-coup alliance stormed a university in cairo, damaging equipment and writing graffiti on the walls. protests on wednesday left 25 people injured and many arrested. >> the bodies of 25 people who drowned off the coast of indonesia are being returned to lebanon. their boat sank whilst trying to make
an education model to reverse the trend. >> chinook middle school applied for and received several grants, using the money for teacher training. test scores since then have gone up, using the same teachers and staff. >> one is providing expectation for the kids, that they can do it, putting a great teacher in front of the students, day in, day out. and looking at the time of the day, to make sure you maximise the time that the kids are learning and involving the parents to the greater degree in the education. >> experts say funding is an important part of the equation. >> raising standards is good, but oftentimes those problems come with an injection of resources. >> many schools receive the same amount of funding or less than a decade ago. the poverty report doesn't signal all doom and cloom. it means schools have to work smarter. >> it's stuff that is already happening to create successful kids in other schools, making it available for everyone. jennifer believes in that philosophy. >> one of my favourite quotes is it's going to be hard, but it will be worth it. i think if they leave he
scared when i think about my daughter. i do not want her to marry. i want her to continue her education. my daughter has not been able to forget the beatings that i suffered for many years. >> reporter: she has been granted a divorce, and her terrible experience and determination to ban child marriages seems to have finally paid off. members of the organization drafting yemen's new constitution say that the charter would set the minimum age for marriage at 18. but some clerics and tribal leaders say they will block the motion of the country's transition to elections expected early next year. >> we don't have any problems related to child marriage. most of the cases are fabricated so foreign institutions impose on yemen. >> reporter: a we hadding i we e capitol. a relative of the bride pays tribute to her and her tribe. then a poet praising the groom. but weddings in yemen are not always this happy. >> this is a country where marrying off young girls to older men is a common practice. we may never know the exact number of the child brides because yemen is a conservative society. and anyo
and attend high-ranking think tanks to get more professional education. the u.s. looks to egypt to help maintain security, particularly between the border with israel, with whom egypt has a peace treaty and the u.s. also looks to egypt to try to make certain that insurgent groups don't find a toehold particularly in the sinai peninsula. but this is really a case of the u.s. trying to be practicigmati right now because egypt, for many, many decades as had an out-sized amount of influence in regional politics. the u.s. sees that in its long-term interests, it's best to still be an ally of egypt rather than have some sort of political and diplomatic rupture. >> kerry making a visit to saudi arabia. how significant is that visit? >> reporter: well, when you consider that up until really in the past three months or so, the relationship between riyadh and washington was unquestionably a strong one, this is an important visit for kerry to make. the saudis have been very concerned that the obama administration simply hasn't done enough to try to bring the civil war in syria to an end, and they
closing wasteful tax loopholes and wants to protect education and road projects. >>> some visitor facilities remain closed after last month's shut down. this includes many of the rest rooms and camp dprownds found at the parks, litter removal and other maintenance has also been cut back. a spokesman for the army corp. of engineers said the resolution that ended the shut town didn't release all of the funds they need. he said it won't be fixed until congress passes a new budget. >> the obama administration said the health care website should be working smoothly by the end of the month. experts said they were able to make progress despite computer crashes. on thursday a house committee released documents showing only six people were able to enroll on october 1st but three million tried to access it. the white house said those numbers are unofficial and said it'll release a accurate count in a couple of weeks. >>> a health care plan in alameda has been removed. it was one of 12 options available on the exchange. it was removed because it failed to get a necessary state license by t
, and the council on foreign relations working on a range of economics and education issues. he is the co-author of a book on girls education and an author of the pro-growth progressive and economic strategy for shared prosperity. gene graduated from the university of minnesota and yale law school and attended wharton business school. is a native of ann arbor, michigan, and will be joining his them in california at the end of this year. when he finishes his remarks will move over here for two and a. thank you very much. gene? >> well, thank you very much for having us here today. i want to thank jim doyle very much, not just for today but for all the leadership of business forward, all the consultations, even the recent meeting with your small business advisory committee as we went into this recent round of budget discussions. so again, i really want to thank you and business forward for the leadership that you've shown, and the desire to look beyond your own particular situation to the larger economic issue that we face as a country, and understanding that that affects all of us. so agai
on a sweeping education overhall and are being asked to pass $1 billion tax increase to boost school funding and the idea is controversial and it's strict. raise per pupil spending hurt by falling revenues. president obama was on the campaign trial not for himself but a fellow democratic and terry is running for governor in virginia and he shared the stage saturday in arlington and he tried to link the opponent to the government shut down. >> we have seen an extreme faction of the republican party that is shown again and again and again that they are willing to hijack the entire party and the country and the economy and grant progress to an absolute halt if they don't get 100% of what they want. >> reporter: he is leading in the polls, there is a governor race in new jersey where they will decide to reelect chris christie. romney is slamming president obama over the affordable care act and on nbc he is unhappy with the similar law that romney signed when he was governor of massachusetts. >> in massachusetts we phased in the requirements so that there was a slow roll out, that way you could
care allow, just as thousands say they are losing their current plans. >> getting more educational bang for your buck. do those college rankings really help finding the best college for your budget? >> coming up in sports, lebron james and the miami heat unveiled another championship banner. we'll have the heights in just a bit. conversation in a live town-hall event. sex crimes on campus, a special week of coverage and live town-hall on america tonight nine eastern. only on al jazeera america. (vo) friday night ... >> does the nsa collect any type of data on millions of americans? >> no sir. (vo) fault lines investigates what it's like to live under the watchful eye of the nsa. >> they know everything that you do, everything that you think, everything that you fear. they know how to manipulate and control you. the state has all the power. >> we have done more to destroy our way of life than the terrorists could ever have done. >> welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. in just about a half hour, the health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius is going to testify b
. we have mitigated disputes across iraq. we also put a foundation of civic education, human rights, and religious moderation for the institutions of education. ip and its partners are proud of the progress we have made. we also recognize a lot remains to be done in iraq, and we see from the unfortunate tragic violence that has still cost many lives the road ahead will not be easy. you excellency, we assure and the iraqi people that as iraq prepare for the 2014 elections and faces challenges to a secure better future for the people, iraq and kept on the support of the u.s. institute for peace for a partner on all levels, starting with the community, two local councils, to international dialogue. thank you. ask theld like to ambassador to come forward. the format today will be an introduction -- come here. it will be an introduction of the prime minister i the ambassador, and in the prime minister will speak. and then sit and take questions. the audience already knows this. if you have questions, perhaps you have already written them out, we will not have time for a great number of q
, but education programs to ensure they don't end up here in the first place. >> here to help us understand what we can do to protect ourselves is a doctor, an assistant professor of neurology. thank you for being here. >> my pleasure. >> why are so many young people suffering strokes >>. >> it's a great question. there's not been a lot of studies designed to answer that question. probably some need to be done. but it's most likely a combination of factors. the first is the surprising incidence of risk factors - such as smoking, people are getting diabetes, obesity, and then the other thing is we are getting better at detecting strokes. technology, mri scanning, and we can pick up more strokes than we used to. >> you mentioned detecting strokes. how can one tell. i understand there's a fast method. >> that is a fantastic question. because strokes can have variable symptoms, it's important that we get out the word on how to tell you are having a stroke. there's a push to educate the government about doing a fast screen. that's the numonic, it's fast. the f stands for face. you look for asymmetry
of education. will the prime minister please use his good offices to ensure the failed application is incorporated its inquiry? have aously, we need to proper policy of making sure that proposals for preschools are ready to go ahead before they go ahead. it is worth making the point that when you look at the free schools in our country, two thirds of them have been judged to be good or outstanding which is a higher proportion than schools within the state sector. so think it is worth not just continuing with this policy by putting rocket boosters on its frequency many more free schools in our country. >> on question nine," and, mr. iorge howard heard >> discussed with mayor george anderson the prospects for the city in terms of overseas investment and the importance of this international festival. i also met hillsboro families. ministerhe prime accept that government support to local government should be related to need? that, how does he explain the households in our region have lost him he pounds over the last two years where the households in his region have gained six? >> is th
. >> ismat said he has no regrets and it was his duty to educate his people. the only way to resist and maintain his dignity. now he says he wants to make use of what he learned in prison and pass it on. >> through teaching hebrew i empower the children so it can understand the mentality of the israelis and gain self confidence. >> after 20 years inside he's come out to a divided palestinian leadership, ever growing israeli settlements and a disillusioned people. stephanie decker in an occupied west bank. >>> three decades after the fall of the kmir rouge, the former ruling party was responsible for one of the worst mass killings of the 20th century. florence louie reports now from nophonpen. >> she watched them die from disease and hunger. after soldiers forced them and millions of others to march to the country side in an attempt to create an agricultural utopia. >> they didn't kill us. they left us in the jungle to die. >> to this day, the memories haunt her. prayers offer her some comfort. but she says she's still unable to sleep and relies on antianxiety medicine. she could be
, educate, engage on subject matters that we think are very important. they can be money in politics, climate change, the state of politics, the influence of power in america, and, like i said, the early mission was, you know, we don't -- we are reporting driven. as you look behind me, i don't know what you can see out there, but we have ten reporters in the bureau alone. we have reporters in other places as well, and, you know, we don't focus on commentary. we don't focus on a lot of local analysis. we do some of that, but mainly we focus on stories we find important, things that are in the news and report them out in a way that is unique and different that's what's happening in the rest of the media, or they can be different but important that are not getting the attention that we believe they should be getting. >> host: what do you think the status of investigative journalism is today for magazines? too many magazines that focus on opinion writing? >> guest: well, i think there's a lot less investigative reporting. i use that praise not in a pa -- pejorative way. the news room and
the excellence in the u.s. higher education how that has always helped us and we train more and better engineers but those days are ending. and so, our natural design advantages i think are going to be harder to come by going forward. we need those things so that we are not starting with a ten to 20% cost disadvantage. >> we talked about this in the european context it is closer to fruition. >> we have a huge business in asia growing that's probably the single largest opportunity over the next decade or so. we intend to lead that market like we do in so many others. but again i come back to the point that it's likely that a lot of those countries -- a number of those will give agreements with or without us if we don't get tpp done and we will be looking at a market that we ought to compete with. there's another 1i will move to africa because i'm kind of passionate about this. we watched the chinese really take over africa. they come in with their own financing and engineering, sometimes their own workers to take over minerals come extraction, hydroelectric power across africa. and i feel we can
education does for children all the way around. not just for their tone or there is a, but the performance in the key subject areas. >> math and science, we can use some mathematicians. clearly in my children. my wife homeschools. we got them into music and immediately, all of their subjects got better. unfortunately, it means everything and one of the first things to go as the music program. -- is the music program. tavis: why did you choose to homeschool? >> we are church people. we are believers. we wanted to make sure that our .hildren were specially guided you don't get that in schools. good at it.ery i don't think it is for everybody. if you are not good, you can hire other people to help you do it.
. >> you know why i'm here, really, i'm an educator now. what way? >> i'm trying to educate people to this problem of a fib. >> it's an irregular heartbeat. >> this affects like almost 6 million people. >> so you know? >> i know. >> she's an educator. >> and if you have it, you're five times more likely to have a stroke. so go easy on yourself. >> i thought your heart was just beating 'cause you were here. >> i'm excited, but i'm very close to having a stroke. but if you want to know more about it, i want to send people to fibs or fact.com. take a quiz. like deal or no deal. for everybody that takes the quiz, not only do you learn something, but you end up -- >> i got a little problem. >> what? >> you're worried about giving people a sudden shock and there is 6 million people with afib, yet you want to stun people with your pranks show. and if someone has afib and on your prank show, without knowing it, you could kill them. >> or you could save their life. >> no. the point is, this is so common and if you know about it, you -- >> i didn't know. >> how did you find out? >> i was goi
in the health of health or education sector. there is 1.6 million children not going to school. that is the normal challenge for the country, how will we makeup for that? we have 50% of the children in madagascar that are malnourished and if we don't do anything the future of the country will be ruined. >> reporter: emergency plan is about to start the spraying program, how quickly or how soon do you hope to see results from that? >> well, fao which is our sister agency has already started with this. they need to make good plans in order to fumigate in the right way and take caution with spraying insecticides and so on. my understanding is they have already started with this and there has not been funding to do it. from that sense with the operations and other factors like a cyclone or something like that, we should see a good outcome. >> reporter: okay, we seem to have lost the connection with tanya page and the guest from the world food program but we do understand that the emergency measures to try and help the farmers and poor people in madagascar appear to be on track. w
and students are trying to find the best match for their education and their bottom line. at issue is whether college rankings help or hinder the search for the right match. we take a look. >> trish, the daughter of immigrants from india, homes to one day become a pediatrician. she's a pre-med major at queens college who lives at home. her tuition is $6,000 a year. which is all her family can afford. it provides large amounts of student aid so student don't have to pick up a job to pay their tuition. >> we're getting students who come from very modest means, first in the family to go to college, maybe first in this country. without us they wouldn't be able to transcend their particular situation and move up. >> reporter: college has everything to do with how families pick schools. >> from working class families. they're selecting the colleges based on affordability and geographical screens of their son or daughter commuting as opposed to living on campus. >> reporter: with tuition on the rise many families are looking at where they can get the most bang for the buck. the washington monthly ha
and science at an early age. i load up my ipad and my phone with educational apps for my girls. we're a mac family. and they know that. app designers know that and mac notes that, android, and they all know it, and that's why they are designing these devices for kids specifically. because they end up stealing their parent's ipads and it's nice to have a device that is boothly colored, that parents can control, and that you can load up with mac games so your kid can get smarter. >> sounds like what they're saying is parents need to be responsible with what they put in their kids' expand we knew that to have these games on an ipad that make you think about math or help you learn to read and have some helper in there along the way, i don't know. seems like a good thing to me, kennedy. >> parents need to be responsible with everything. and the apa is saying kids shouldn't have smartphones and commuters in their berms. >> blah, blah, blah. >> that's common sense you don't need some body telling you about every decision. >> they said the same about the eight track player and the phone, and i elvi
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